Graeme −> Odds and Ends −> Holiday schedule 

I work at a company where we get ten holidays each year.  We also get three personal days, to cover the holidays the company doesn't recognize.  The holidays the company does recognize are New Years, Martin Luther King, Presidents, Memorial, Independence, Labor, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.  Five of the holidays always fall on particular days of the week, and never on Saturday or Sunday.  So they're taken when they fall.  Plus the Friday after Thanksgiving.  The other four days are taken for New Year's, Independence, and Christmas, but it's not easy to figure out in advance which holidays will be two-day holidays and which will be single-day holidays.

I've worked here for over eight years, and I've kept track of the holidays over the past five years.  What follows is by no means "company policy", but it does represent my guess as to how the holiday calendar is calculated.  It's one way to set up some rules that result in exactly 10 holidays each year.

Now I'll consider how my company allocates four days each year to be taken for New Year's, Independence, and Christmas.  (The other six days are the same year after year.)  Generally, the holiday is taken on the day it falls.  But if it falls on a Saturday, the Friday is taken.  If it falls on a Sunday, the Monday is taken.  It's great if the two-day holiday can be parlayed into a four-day weekend, so if one of these days falls on a Tuesday or Thursday, then it will probably be the two-day holiday.  I say "probably" because this rule has two main exceptions -- the New Year's Eve Exceptions -- for example, if New Year's falls on a Tuesday, it can't be made a 2-day holiday in this year, because the Monday falls in a different year.  Also, for a similar reason, if New Year's falls on a Saturday, it can't be taken at all, because the Friday falls in a different year.  In addition, if Christmas falls on a Monday, then it becomes a 2-day holiday.

To make up for the New Year's Eve problem, we make New Year's Eve -- at the end of the year -- a holiday if it falls on a Friday.  In the following year, which begins on Saturday, there is no New Year's Day holiday, so we give an extra personal day.  In addition, we give an extra personal day in years that end on Saturday.

Using these rules, almost all years come out with four holidays.  The only exceptions are leap years that begin or end on Thursday.  So I'll add just two more rules: (1) if a leap year begins on a Thursday, then the New Years holiday is just a one-day holiday; it's back to work on Friday.  This is OK, though, because just a week prior, Christmas was a 2-day holiday.  (2) if a leap year ends on a Thursday, then it's a holiday, to make a 2-day New Year's holiday.

If you haven't been following along (and I don't blame you; it's gotten a little complicated) then I'll summarize the rules, and show how they apply to each of the 28 possible calendars.

Holiday Rules

1. One day for New Year's Day, except two if it falls on Thursday (except leap years).

2. If New Year's Day falls on a Saturday, the holiday is given as an holiday in some other part of the year -- e.g. in 2000, Christmas, which falls on a Monday, was made into a 2-day holiday when it wouldn't otherwise be.  (Don't fret; New Year's Eve was a holiday in the prior year.)

3. One day for Independence Day, except two if it falls on a Tuesday or Thursday.

4. One day for Christmas, except two if it falls on a Monday, Tuesday or Thursday.

5. If New Year's Eve (December 31st) falls on a Friday, then it is a holiday.

6. In leap years, if New Year's Eve falls on a Thursday, then it is a holiday, which combines with the following year's New Year's Day to make a two-day holiday.

7. If New Year's Eve falls on a Saturday, then the holiday is given as an extra holiday in some other part of the year -- e.g. an extra personal day.  (Don't fret; New Year's Day will be taken on Monday of the following year.)

Year New Years Christmas Independence Next N.Y.Eve Notes

1995

Sun

1

Mon

1

Tue

2

Sun

 

 

1996

Mon

1

Wed

1

Thu

2

Tue

 

 

1997

Wed

1

Thu

2

Fri

1

Wed

 

 

1998

Thu

2

Fri

1

Sat

1

Thu

 

 

1999

Fri

1

Sat

1

Sun

1

Fri

1

 

2000

Sat

 

Mon

2

Tue

2

Sun

 

Monday Christmas is a 2-day
holiday, during leap years.

2001

Mon

1

Tue

2

Wed

1

Mon

 

 

2002

Tue

1

Wed

1

Thu

2

Tue

 

 

2003

Wed

1

Thu

2

Fri

1

Wed

 

 

2004

Thu

1

Sat

1

Sun

1

Fri

1

Friday after New Year's Day
is not a holiday in leap year.

2005

Sat

 

Sun

1

Mon

1

Sat

 

2 extra days for year
starting and ending Sat.

2006

Sun

1

Mon

1

Tue

2

Sun

 

 

2007

Mon

1

Tue

2

Wed

1

Mon

 

 

2008

Tue

1

Thu

2

Fri

1

Wed

 

 

2009

Thu

2

Fri

1

Sat

1

Thu

 

 

2010

Fri

1

Sat

1

Sun

1

Fri

1

 

2011

Sat

 

Sun

1

Mon

1

Sat

 

2 extra days for year
starting and ending Sat.

2012

Sun

1

Tue

2

Wed

1

Mon

 

 

2013

Tue

1

Wed

1

Thu

2

Tue

 

 

2014

Wed

1

Thu

2

Fri

1

Wed

 

 

2015

Thu

2

Fri

1

Sat

1

Thu

 

 

2016

Fri

1

Sun

1

Mon

1

Sat

 

1 extra day for year
ending Sat

2017

Sun

1

Mon

1

Tue

2

Sun

 

 

2018

Mon

1

Tue

2

Wed

1

Mon

 

 

2019

Tue

1

Wed

1

Thu

2

Tue

 

 

2020

Wed

1

Fri

1

Sat

1

Thu

1

New Year's Eve. Thu is a holiday in leap year.

2021

Fri

1

Sat

1

Sun

1

Fri

1

 

2022

Sat

 

Sun

1

Mon

1

Sat

 

2 extra days for year starting and ending Sat.

This holiday schedule was made up based on the last five years' experience; it doesn't represent company policy.  But if the company would like to use these rules to make their holiday schedule in future, that's just fine.